Purearth Packaging by Afterhours

March 30th, 2015 by retail design blog

Strategy, branding, packaging and tone of voice for Purearth Cleanse Ltd. Launched into the UK juicing market, two years ago, in that short time they have seen great success, rising from a small, exclusively online cleanse programme provider to become one of the the most popular and recommended functional juice and detox brands in London and the south of England. However as Purearth has grown, so has the competition. The Purearth founders knew they needed to review their brand strategy and execution in order to strengthen their presence and distinction, take their story to a wider audience and deliver a brand that matched their ambitions. That’s where we came in!


The first step was developing a compelling brand idea that captured their point of difference. The next, a creative concept that had the power to transition all the brand’s touch points and comms channels. One with the cut-through and emotion to engage a new audience. The new identity elevates their bottle tags from a functional packaging feature to a core brand asset. The tag becoming the vehicle to deliver the creative hook- the juices as a ‘gift from the earth’.


The tag and its loving messages to its recipient forms the central branding concept- speaking to the customer on shelf and engaging cleanse clients during their personal programmes. It becomes the canvas for communications and promotions too. Limited editions for events and partners play with the visual language of the tag, becoming a ‘designer label’ for London Fashion Week shows or a ‘VIP badge’ for festival partnerships. It also become a physical ‘hash tag’ to roll out across social media highlighting their super food ingredients and benefits. The whole concept is designed to cause maximum disruption and engagement. Driving affinity and advocacy with loyalists and also introducing the benefits of their super juices to the uninitiated. The redesign has helped secure new distribution, listings and investment and has given the business a new voice in the market place.

Design: Afterhours
Additional Credits: Kelly Bennett, Moyra Casey, Chris McDonald




via Packaging of the World

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