Posts Tagged ‘Brasil’

Anselmi flagship store by 3DDesign Arquitetura, Porto Alegre – Brasil

October 12th, 2016

The highlight of the store is a tree made with 10,000 demolition wood chips. The tree represents a family and the wood chips remembers the wooden roofs used by the first Italian immigrants in Rio Grande do Sul.

Coca-Cola pavilion by Atelier Marko Brajovic, Rio de Janeiro – Brasil

August 16th, 2016

The visual effect of movement is enhanced by lightning system programmed to react on different events as concerts, games and other brand activations. The main installation as well organize and introduce the public into the interactive installations as photo in 360 degrees, real-time dance game, a gallery, concert stage… and entrance to the store.

Duplex 312 by Kali Architecture, Porto Alegre – Brasil

July 23rd, 2016

The intention to highlight the stage and create a way through the main hall, the position of the new steel staircase introduced a new element: the walkway, which brings a greater connection to the place, allowing an overview of the main and privileged hall stage.

Botti store by Suite Architects, São Paulo – Brasil

July 22nd, 2014

For Botti store renovation Suite Architects used the principles of upcycle.

Walmart.com offices by Estudio Guto Requena, São Paulo – Brasil

December 28th, 2013

Each floor was designed with a predominant wood type. Pine, OSB, Eucalyptus and Masisa Zurich combine with a single color in various shades, all chosen from the official Walmart color palate of yellow, orange, blue and green.

Deliqatê restaurant by FGMF Arquitetos, São Paulo – Brasil

December 27th, 2013

Occupying a lot at Alameda Jaú in the Jardins district, São Paulo, Deliqatê is a restaurant specialized in gourmet sandwiches and is the first enterprise from this group of investors whose intention is to take it to other capital cities in the country.

ADINA showroom by F.I.Bra architecture, Brasil

April 26th, 2013

The project main objective was to expose the entire collection of fabrics, ribbons and accessories in a factory stripped environment. We chose to use neutral materials and colors with black and white pattern scales in order to visually not compete with the main topic of the environment, the ADINA product mix itself.