Leonardiana. Un Museo Nuovo exhibition by Migliore+Servetto Architects, Vigevano – Italy

June 7th, 2016 by retail design blog

Castello di Vigevano – located in the historic town in Northern Italy – has been refurbished to host an exhibition space dedicated to works of Leonardo da Vinci. The ambitious revitalisation plan was launched through a competition hosted by Consorzio A.S.T, which was won by Migliore+Servetto Architects. The firm conceived the permanent display ‘Leonardiana. Un Museo Nuovo’ using interactive and innovative narration tools, allowing visitors to explore the great artist’s ideas and main phases during his lifetime.

Leonardo da Vinci’s work spans many fields including art, architecture, science, and mathematics all of which is presented in an orderly assemblage within the interior. Light tools, multimedia and environmental graphic design, have been used to help convey the main concepts that underpin the renaissance man.

The exhibition itinerary winds along the historical rooms of the castle, showcasing reproductions of the artist’s work. A large grid-like structure is used to display the drawings, as well as stands below showing books letters and notes. The contemporary nature of the installation, compliments the original pieces which date back to the fourteenth century.













http://www.designboom.com/design/migliore-servetto-leonardo-da-vinci-castello-di-vigevano-italy-06-05-2016/

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One thought on “Leonardiana. Un Museo Nuovo exhibition by Migliore+Servetto Architects, Vigevano – Italy

  1. Thanks for this – but it’s the late 15th century. The dawn of the Renaissance.

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